Art Critique: Mr and Mrs William Hallett (‘The Morning Walk’) by Thomas Gainsborough, 1785

Mr and Mrs William Hallett ('The Morning Walk') by Thomas Gainsborough, 1785

When I went to the National Gallery in London, England, I saw a life-size, oil and canvas painting by Gainsborough titled, “The Morning Walk.” I liked it for three simple reasons: 1) I love Gainsborough’s light, feathery brushstrokes 2) I related the painting to my boyfriend and me walking my silly dog as part of our daily routine. 3) It was featured as a backdrop in the James Bond “Skyfall” movie– when he first meets Q (CLIP HERE).

Q & Bond at the National Gallery, London.

Q & Bond at the National Gallery, London.

However, I digress. The point is, this painting was made for a simple reason: to create a marriage portrait for William Hallett and Elizabeth Stephen (both aged 21 at the time) and due to be married in the summer of 1785. The couple solemnly link arms to walk in woodland landscape with a panting, joyful Spitz dog at Elizabeth’s heel. According to the National Gallery, “Portraits of wealthy sitters posed in a natural setting and dressed in their finest (but not necessarily most practical) clothes were a popular status symbol.” The conversation piece, which is the undone jacket and with one hand tucked into it is a stance seen in many fashionable 18th-centry informal portraits. There is also speculation that Elizabeth’s ivory silk dress is her wedding dress.

Art Critique: Composition II in Red, Blue and Yellow by Piet Mondrian, 1930

Expressing a universal cosmic order with Art

 Composition II in Red, Blue and Yellow by Piet Mondrian, 1930 – Part of the De Stijil Art Movement

Piet Mondrian’s intention was to move the viewer through his clean, balanced compositions in his pieces. It was his belief that his viewer can conceptualize the spirit realm, which existed outside of time and space.

The artwork uses primary colours of blue, yellow, red with values of white and black, and along with horizontal and vertical lines to create a harmonious, balanced composition.

Fashion Designer, Yves Henri-Donat Matthieu-Saint Laurent (one of my favourite designers better known as YSL …OR “SLP”) was inspired by Mondrian when he created the “Mondrian” Day Dress (Fall 1965) . He knew that “the planarity of the dress was an ideal field for colour blocks” (Metropolitan Museum of Art). An excellent example of how art and fashion meet.


Posers: Contemporary Portraits

Posers:  Contemporary Portraits

“Posers” is a group exhibition that explores portraiture as a method of documentation and self-expression.

Local artists, illustrators and photographers will go beyond capturing physical likeness, challenging a traditional convention by using a diverse range of visual language – both cultural and contemporary. In examining the poser’s subtleties, the artist not only reveals the subject’s personality and history, but also his/her personal significance to the artist.

Today, portraiture is almost instantaneous – faces are everywhere and not only on people. They are seen on posters and magazines, computer and mobile screens, Facebook profiles and Instagram feeds. Portraits are posted of both humans and animals alike either mocked, adored or loved. Candid or not, these subjects become posers, representing an identity and a society that shapes it.

These studies and observed moments go beyond the simple act of capturing a face – stories are told and insights are unveiled. Collectively, the works in the exhibition will interpret the idea of meaningful portraiture as an ongoing dialogue between the poser, the artist and the society they live in.

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I went to the opening reception at Oz studios with a couple of friends to support the artists involved in the exhibition. We admired the artwork and cheered on one of my best friends, Chelsea Canlas and her revered artworks. The opening reception was filled with admirers, art lovers and locals.

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THIS IS A MUST READ!!!
A beautiful post!

becomingelizabeth

D&G via Cretus

D&G

Recipe via Raspberri CupcakesPPQ Spring 2012 via Chic Genre Miu Miu Applique BagLouis Vuitton ad via Keep in Touch with Fashion

Cream Ice Cream Embroidered Cardigan By KTZ**Kate Middleton via mirror.co.ukOscar de la Renta TiaraSera Park “The Dessert Lady”
Kate Moss by Tim Walker for Vogue
Mary Katrantzou pencil skirt
If only this existed (source unknown)Pastel Bib Necklace via
MinuseyPastel Manicure via AmebloMacaron Trinket Boxes viaSiteNYCVogue HellasKarolina Kurkovasource unknownJudith Leiber minaudiere via Luxury Launches Auguste Abeliunaite for Voguevia The LaneMeadham Kirchhoff headpiece

Sometimes you need a little sugar in your wardrobe, just like you take your tea. This fall, spring pastels get an update with heavy embroidery, piled on jewels, and all around decadence. Go ahead, dress like a princess.

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Majorca/ Mallorca: the island boasts history and tons of sunshine

The largest island in Spain’s Balearic Islands archipelago, Majorca, is a beautiful place filled with happy inhabitants, good, familiar Spanish cuisine, an abundance of historic architecture and of course, scenic views of mountains and pristine beaches. I stayed in Palma … Continue reading

A refresher in Rococo fashion:

History of Costume

A significant shift in culture occurred in France and elsewhere at the beginning of the 18th century, known as the Enlightenment, which valued reason over authority.  In France, the sphere of influence for art, culture and fashion shifted from Versailles to Paris, where the educated bourgeoisie class gained influence and power in salons and cafés.  The new fashions introduced therefore had a greater impact on society, affecting not only royalty and aristocrats, but also middle and even lower classes.  Ironically, the single most important figure to establish Rococo fashions was Louis XV’s mistress Madame Pompadour.  She adored pastel colors and the light, happy style which came to be known as Rococo, and subsequently light stripe and floral patterns became popular.  Towards the end of the period, Marie Antoinette became the leader of French fashion, as did her dressmaker Rose Bertin.  Extreme extravagance was her trademark, which ended up majorly fanning the flames of the French…

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